Posts tagged with ‘homosexualitys’ include the following:

On Lions' Pride →

caymanwent:

benkling:

Here’s an article I wrote for this week’s Berkely Beacon about activism vs. chic slacktivism, as it applies to a specific LGBT rally on my campus.

It covers the Venn overlap of two of my favorite topics: Gen-Y social psychology and gender issues.

Although it’s aimed at Emerson students, you’ll appreciate it if you’ve ever seen someone wearing an oh-so-chic Legalize Gay shirt and then bragging about how fun it is shopping with their obligatory gayfriend. Or seen people squee-ing and aw-ing at gay couples simply because they’re gay, which is reductive and thinly masked fetishization of the Other.

Or if, you know, you’ve been on a tumblr dashboard for more than ten minutes. Meet our generation.

Is this necessarily a bad thing, though? Acceptance is acceptance, whether its an honest attempt at fostering equality or (I like the turn of phrase) fetishization of the Other.

Sure, I get annoyed frequently by the portrayal of LGBT characters in mass media, because they take an assumption on what these people are like and use that as their basis for character development.

Sure, a good number of people aren’t familiar with “gay culture” to be able to fully understand its diversity and complexity. Many might think that wearing a pro-gay shirt or going to a gay bar/club is the chic thing to do. Still, salience—in any form—is a step forward. I’d rather have people accepting me for reasons I don’t necessarily agree with than outright rejecting me.

I disagree, respectfully, and here’s why: it’s not a step forward, it’s a step diagonally. It may appear to be progressive, but it’s not moving in the right direction. We’re trying to build the foundation of a more accepting society, where boundaries aren’t as restrictive. But this attitude, this fetishization, positions anyone who is gay as Other.

Because being open-minded is not as simple as mimicking the behaviors of an open-minded person. To fall back on a trusty ol’ Chuck P quote, sticking feathers up your butt does not make you a chicken.

I’m going to republish something I said in an old ask question, because it’s relevant here:

[…] many people aren’t really learning what it means to be open-minded, but are just accepting movements as they become popular.

It reminds me of my baby cousin. She kept trying to eat inedible objects, but she didn’t understand when I tried to teach her “don’t eat anything but food.”

So I had to teach her, one by one, “don’t eat the brush. don’t eat money—shit, I mean—don’t eat pennies, nickles, quarters, OR dimes. don’t eat the blocks. that includes A, B, C, D…”

A disturbing amount of people have just been taught “don’t discriminate against black people. don’t discriminate against hispanic people. don’t discriminate against women.”

Then, when it comes to one that they haven’t learned yet, like discrimination against Indian people, or discrimination against men, they just don’t—fucking—get it. They don’t get that the “don’t eat inedible objects” lesson here is “don’t discriminate against ANYONE.”

(via caymanwent-deactivated20120606)

On Lions' Pride →

Here’s an article I wrote for this week’s Berkely Beacon about activism vs. chic slacktivism, as it applies to a specific LGBT rally on my campus.

It covers the Venn overlap of two of my favorite topics: Gen-Y social psychology and gender issues.

Although it’s aimed at Emerson students, you’ll appreciate it if you’ve ever seen someone wearing an oh-so-chic Legalize Gay shirt and then bragging about how fun it is shopping with their obligatory gayfriend. Or seen people squee-ing and aw-ing at gay couples simply because they’re gay, which is reductive and thinly masked fetishization of the Other.

Or if, you know, you’ve been on a tumblr dashboard for more than ten minutes. Meet our generation.